Auteurs and Authors, Writers I Love

A Font of Horror: Stranger Things

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The type is called Benguiat. It’s the font of my childhood, big and mysterious and curving in a way that suggests the edge of something sharp, something dangerous. Something we, as children, should not be handling. Viking used it, in part, to make Stephen King’s name iconic on their covers, though most would agree (myself included) that King himself did the real carving out, cutting his name into our imaginations like a mad-skilled butcher — but not with Benguiat, no; he did it with the dull, spoon-like edges of an Underwood’s Courier-shaped keys. And in this way, the Duffer Brothers’ Stranger Things affects us. It entices us with a font, makes us remember a very specific set of iconography, then draws us into something far deeper, far richer: a collective well of imagination.

Auteurs and Authors

The Shining: In Praise of Shelley Duvall

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Post-Doctor Sleep, there was a great deal of talk in book presses and blogs about Stephen King’s well known take on Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 adaptation of The Shining. No secret by now that King has strong dislike for the film, mostly owing to Kubrick’s interpretation of the characters and his cold tone. Wendy, for example, King says, is one of the most misogynistic portrayals of a woman ever committed to film (his take paraphrased). I recently re-read Roger Ebert’s review of The Shining, one of his Great Movies, and at the end of the review he tells the story of asking Shelley Duvall what it was like working on the picture. “Almost unbearable,” is her answer. She describes the year-long shoot as nine months of crying, five and six days a week.

She means crying in the role of Wendy Torrance, of course, but in Vivian Kubrick’s documentary, Making The Shining, we catch glimpses of very real tears. Duvall has a fainting spell; the assistant director cracks wise. Jack Nicholson ignores her, directs his flirtations elsewhere. Kubrick himself mutters impatiently, occasionally yells at her. Duvall, as tall and strikingly pretty as she is, like a weird, wide-eyed forest creature by way of Tim Burton, seems small and frail on set, almost overlooked. “After all that work,” she tells Ebert, “hardly anyone even criticized my performance in it, even to mention it, it seemed like. The reviews were all about Kubrick. Like I wasn’t there.”